Unwins Seeds

Autumn Planting vegetables

02 October 2014 | Posted in Gardening by The Unwins Family

Autumn Planting vegetables

Autumn planting vegetables such as hardy peas and broad beans will crop early next summer, several weeks ahead of the spring sown crops. Winter lettuce and salad leaves will keep going throughout winter if you give them some protection with fleece or cloches.

Broad beans are hardy plants so they are a great over wintering crop. Choose a hardy bean such as ‘Aquadulce Claudia’ for tender and tasty beans that are ready from May and June. Just as tasty and tender, but shorter and easier to manage, especially   if your garden is windy, is Broad Bean ‘The Sutton’; because it’sshorter it will cope better in exposed sites.

Our young broad bean plants are supplied in 12 single sown modules each with a good root system and they are growing strongly when you receive them.

Peas Pea ‘Douce Provence’ is a very versatile variety that can be overwintered to give an early crop of sweet and tasty peas. It’s a reliable performer producing high yields and because the plants are compact they won’t require much support. This variety is hardy enough to be grown just about all year round.

Broad beans and peas are hardy but be prepared to protect these overwintering plants from severe weather if necessary; a covering of fleece is ideal.

Salad leaves Salad Provencale mix is the one to choose if you want tasty cut-and-come-again salad leaves that will brave winter weather. Team with lettuce ‘Winter Density’ and you’ll be enjoying crisp tender salad leaves from December through to March.

Plant the young plants 20cm/8in apart in their final positions outside into well prepared weed free soil. Add some pre planting fertiliser if necessary. Give the peas and beans some support with canes as they grow. Net salad leaves to avoid damage from pigeons and mice.

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